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International Journal of Innovation and Applied Studies
ISSN: 2028-9324     CODEN: IJIABO     OCLC Number: 828807274     ZDB-ID: 2703985-7
 
 
Monday 17 June 2019

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The Management of Binocular Vision Anomalies by Eye Care Facilities in the Accra and Kumasi Metropolises (Ghana)


Volume 9, Issue 3, November 2014, Pages 1401–1408

 The Management of Binocular Vision Anomalies by Eye Care Facilities in the Accra  and Kumasi Metropolises (Ghana)

C. Opoku-Baah1, A. K. Mohammed2, C. Afari3, R. Addai4, F. Yemanyi5, S. Adade6, and K. Bonsu7

1 Department of Optometry and Visual Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
2 Department of Optometry and Visual Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
3 Department of Optometry and Visual Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
4 Department of Optometry and Visual Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
5 Department of Optometry and Visual Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
6 Department of Optometry and Visual Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
7 Department of Optometry and Visual Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

Original language: English

Received 20 October 2014

Copyright © 2014 ISSR Journals. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract


This study sought to determine the state of management of binocular vision anomalies by eye care facilities in two major cities in Ghana: Accra and Kumasi. Using the snow balling technique, 86 eye care centres were sampled from the two cities from January to February, 2014. Well-structured questionnaires, verbal interviews and in most cases observational check-ups were employed in the data collection process. Out of the 86 clinics, 51 (59.3%) were located in the Accra metropolis. Binocular Vision Anomalies were reported to be managed by 63 (73.3%) clinics. Majority of the clinics (69.8%) managed accommodative dysfunction with added lenses (69.8%) being the most-employed method. Overall, 79 (91.9%) clinics reported that they referred unmanaged cases and mostly to the ophthalmologist (55.7%). It was found that reports of adequate training in management of binocular vision anomalies and number of instruments owned by the clinics were positively associated with management of binocular vision anomalies (p value =0.001 and p value =0.000 respectively). Based on the report of the clinics, it could be concluded that although some form of binocular vision anomalies are managed by most clinics, there is possibly lack of efficient provision of services as most clinics lacked instruments that are required in detecting, measuring and managing Binocular vision anomalies. It is therefore recommended that to ensure provision of more efficient and quality binocular vision services to clients, eye clinics in the country should endeavour to obtain the equipment that are necessary for managing Binocular vision anomalies.

Author Keywords: binocular vision anomalies, management, eye care centres, services, instruments.


How to Cite this Article


C. Opoku-Baah, A. K. Mohammed, C. Afari, R. Addai, F. Yemanyi, S. Adade, and K. Bonsu, “The Management of Binocular Vision Anomalies by Eye Care Facilities in the Accra and Kumasi Metropolises (Ghana),” International Journal of Innovation and Applied Studies, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 1401–1408, November 2014.