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International Journal of Innovation and Applied Studies
ISSN: 2028-9324     CODEN: IJIABO     OCLC Number: 828807274     ZDB-ID: 2703985-7
 
 
Wednesday 18 July 2018

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Intellectual behaviour of module tutors to predict student satisfaction and intention to leave: An empirical study from Malaysian Private Higher Education Institutions


Volume 8, Issue 3, September 2014, Pages 964–975

 Intellectual behaviour of module tutors to predict student satisfaction and intention  to leave: An empirical study from Malaysian Private Higher Education Institutions

Zubair Hassan1

1 Senior Lecturer, FTMS College, Technlogy Park Malaysia, Bukit Jalil, Malaysia

Original language: English

Received 26 July 2014

Copyright © 2014 ISSR Journals. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract


The purpose of this study is identifying the intellectual behaviour of module tutors and its impact on student's satisfaction and intention to leave. A sample size of 151 full-time students was randomly chosen from various educational institutions. A multi-factor leadership questionnaire with a Likert-Scale from 1-5 was used to collected the data to determine students perception of intellectual behaviour displayed by module tutors at various level in key different academic institutions in Malaysia. Intellectual behaviour is measured using five variables namely idealised attributes, idealised behaviour, intellectual stimulations, inspirational motivation and individual considerations. These variables were initially established by previous studies as dimensions of transformational leadership. To ensure reliability and validity of the data set, sample size only includes students who have been with the educational institution for minimum one semester. The correlation analysis shows that all the in IA, IB, IS, IM and IC were significant and highly correlated with student satisfaction. However, this study found only IS is significant and negatively correlated with student's intention to leave. Also this study found increased in level of satisfaction is significant and negatively correlated with intention to leave. In terms of multiple regression analysis, this study found that only idealised attributes (IA) and individual considerations (IC) were significant and positively influences students satisfaction. However, this study shows none of the variables of intellectual behaviour has any significant impact on student's intention to leave. However, the increased level of satisfaction was found to have a significantly negative impact on student's intention to leave. The current study contributes to the body of research by investigating the combined impacts of intellectual behaviour on student satisfaction using one instrument, in cross-sectional area setting. This research shows that intellectual; behaviour of transformational leadership is crucial in improving student satisfaction and intention to leave. Future research should be undertaken on different context or by increasing the sample size by widening the research context to ensure validity and reliability of the results.

Author Keywords: Transformational leadership (TL), intellectual behaviour, Intellectual Stimulation (IS), Idealised Behaviour (IB), Idealised Attributes (IA), Individual Consideration (IC), Educational settings, students' satisfaction, Malaysia.


How to Cite this Article


Zubair Hassan, “Intellectual behaviour of module tutors to predict student satisfaction and intention to leave: An empirical study from Malaysian Private Higher Education Institutions,” International Journal of Innovation and Applied Studies, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 964–975, September 2014.